Stop the Saatchi Bill

Driven by an extraordinary two-year PR campaign on social media and a supportive newspaper partner, this all started as Lord Saatchi’s Medical Innovation Bill, metamorphosed through several versions, and was resurrected under a new name by Chris Heaton-Harris, before finally clearing its last hurdle in the Lords this week to become the Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Act. Pretty much the only thing they share is the word 'Innovation' in the title.

One day, it may be possible for politicians to ask the people who actually work in the medical field: what are the problems you face, and how can we help you overcome them?

One day, politicians may actually listen to the answers they receive, and thus try to tackle genuine problems rather than imagined ones.

One day, politicians, medics, researchers, lawyers, patient groups, charities, and the public, may work together to overcome the barriers to the development and provision of new treatments.

But it is not this day.

Read more: Not this day

Price Slater Gawne

Price Slater Gawne

Lord Saatchi has a name that is associated with advertising and the media. The media currently (possibly at the behest of the Government) is beating a drum that sends out a message suggesting that doctors live in perpetual fear of litigation. It is not clear where this information has come from. There is no statistical or empirical evidence to back up that suggestion, nor is there any suggestion of defensive medicine being practised. Once again, it would appear that Daily Mail headlines and alarmist reporting about compensation culture is being used as a justification for ill thought out legislation.
Medical Innovation Bill Saatchi Bill
2014-06-05T11:51:57+01:00
Lord Saatchi has a name that is associated with advertising and the media. The media currently (possibly at the behest of the Government) is beating a drum that sends out a message suggesting that doctors live in perpetual fear of litigation. It is not clear where this information has come from. There is no statistical or empirical evidence to back up that suggestion, nor is there any suggestion of defensive medicine being practised. Once again, it would appear that Daily Mail headlines and alarmist reporting about compensation culture is being used as a justification for ill thought out legislation.